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Announcement: Food Vendor Lawsuit Settlement

22 Apr 2019

Attention Food Vendors! SVP has recently obtained preliminary approval of a class action lawsuit on behalf of more than 300 vendors whose vending carts and other property was seized and then discarded by New York City enforcement agents. Vendors who are part of the class will be receiving notices by mail and are eligible for between $585 and $1000 to reimburse them for their discarded property.

For further information about the settlement please go here.

 

A Day for Vendors

17 Nov 2018

There are lots of silly holidays these days, from National Guacamole Day all the way to National Clean-Out-Your-Fridge Day. Most of them are shameless plugs sold by public relations flacks on behalf of big companies. But International Street Vendors Day, celebrated around the world each November 14th, is something different. It is not trying to sell you anything. Instead, the point is simply to recognize the contributions that vendors make and raise awareness on the significant challenges they face, from India to Spain to Kenya. And yes, here in New York.

We always try to celebrate this special, if slightly made-up, day. A few years ago we did clean-up after Hurricane Sandy, last year we celebrated with vendors at our office, and this year we had a dumpling-making event with some close friends and supporters. We also reached out to a bunch of StreetNet affiliates around the world and compiled this very short video greeting. Enjoy!

Ultimate honors

26 Sep 2018

Not a lot of events can keep going strong for fourteen years! But the Vendy Awards, our annual fundraiser / cook-off festival for the best NYC mobile food vendors, is something special.

This year's event, held last Saturday, was no different. With blessings of the weather gods, we had a gorgeous day, as usual.  More than a thousand people boarded the ferry to Governor's Island to partake. There was excitement in the air, as 25 vendors cooked their hearts out in five categories, including our special Best Breakfast prize.

While not everyone could take home the Vendy Cup (left, with overall winner Royal Halal Food)  it felt like everyone was a winner. The vendors got some great press, which should give their businesses a boost. Their stories got told, helping change the narrative about the quality of food on our city streets and the people who make it.  And the issues we fight for at SVP got understood just a little bit better.

#MeToo Movement

19 Aug 2018

Around the world, a majority of street vendors are women. In Bolivia, about 80% of vendors are female. In Zimbabwe, that number is 70%. No matter the country, women vendors are worse off than their male counterparts. They invariably have fewer resources, and they face greater issues of safety and harassment, including by law enforcement officials.

In New York, the majority of vendors are men, but the number of women is significant and rising, even though their stories go relatively untold.  A survey we did last year of vendors in Corona, Queens found that a whopping 79% of vendors in that neighborhood were women! At SVP, we have always had strong women leaders, and our current Leadership Board is no exception. Several of them, like Eliana, Kele and Heleadora (left) have reinvigorated our Women's Committee, which (with the help of some of you!) rented a space and sold at Harlem Day yesterday, not just talking about women's financial empowerment, but doing it.

Somebody’s Watching You

20 Jul 2018

Does it sometimes feel like that? If you were a food vendor in NYC, you would be right to feel that way.

Because last month, the Department of Health announced plans to place GPS trackers on each of the city's 5,000 or so mobile food carts and trucks. The city claims it needs GPS to locate carts to conduct inspections. But vendors (some of whom, by the way, are undocumented immigrants) don't trust the city, not even a little. And they surely don't trust the federal government at a time when ICE is showing up in courtrooms, schools, and green card hearings to find people and deport them. Last week we attended the hearing to testify against this bad idea.

Hopefully, Mayor de Blasio, who likes to claim NYC is a "Sanctuary City," will step in to stop this plan. If not, we are prepared to sue. After all, no lower court than the US Supreme Court  has recently taken an expansive view of the rights of individuals to be free from constant digital surveillance. 

Threatening?

15 Jun 2018

Sometimes you have to run as fast as you can, just to stay in place. That happened with the introduction of three anti-vendor bills at City Council last week which are being pushed through council at breakneck speed. 

One of these bills would evict 22 vending businesses from various streets around the World Trade Center, in Lower Manhattan - putting about 30 people out of work. The impetus?  According to the NYPD, vague "security" threats that a vendor might plant a bomb in their pushcart. To us, that sounds Islamophobic, especially given that 18 of these 22 vending carts are Muslim-run. In fact, vendors are good for public safety, and these vendors often report suspicious people and packages to the police, helping keep us all safe.

We organized about 50 vendors to testify at the hearing yesterday, got great support from allied organizations, and generated some good press hits. But we'll have to keep fighting to keep these streets open to vending - and safe !  These vendors are part of our community. They are #notathreat.

Less than human

22 May 2018

President Trump's calling immigrants "animals" this week has many people rightly taking note of how dangerous is such dehumanizing language.

But vendors, so frequently the target of racism and anti-immigrant bias, are used to being portrayed as less than human. Way back in 1938, Deputy Mayor Curran described a band of flower peddlers who "infested" his neighborhood. And even today, vendors still get described as locusts, leeches, and "bees in a hive." And that is in public - just imagine what is said behind closed doors!

Until things change, we'll keep on policing language -- because it matters -- and demonstrating the humanity of every flesh-and-blood person who sells on the streets of our great city.

Whose community?

26 Apr 2018

Neutral processes don't always produce fair outcomes. Why? The playing field is not level to start.

Which is why it is never enough for the government to "hold a community meeting". Who came to your meeting? Who even knew about it? Was translation provided to those who showed up? This idea was illustrated beautifully this week in this City Limits article on the NYPD's efforts to improve police-community relations. Even if the police had the best of intentions, these meetings became outlets for wealthy residents and business interests to complain about marginalized folks, including the homeless and street vendors.

Note to NYPD: instead of spending $3.5 million on slick ads, you could just ask vendors next time. Or ask us to! We have lots of members who would love to give you a piece of their mind.

World Urban Forum 9

29 Mar 2018

SVP organizes vendors in New York, but if we can be small voice for vendors around the world, we will. SVP director Sean Basinski and SVP leader Lei Bai traveled to the World Urban Forum in Kuala Lumpur  last month. When we design and build our cities, we must make sure that street vendors (and other marginalized users of public space) are included.  We spoke on a panel about "Decent Work in Inclusive Cities" with other informal sector workers and organizations, and made connections that we hope will advance our agenda back home. Sean was lucky enough to get interviewed by Next City about whether street vendors are part of the city of the future, a clip of which can be heard here.

After Malaysia, we flew to Bangkok, where WIEGO has been convening local vendor associations threatened by evictions from the military government there. We were happy to provide some advice, and learn some lessons from the vendors there forming a city-wide coalition to fight for their rights.

Mr. Okra

28 Feb 2018

Its not very often that humble street vendors get an obituary in the New York Times. But who could miss the sendoff last week of Arthur J. Robinson of New Orleans? Robinson (aka Mr. Okra) sold fruits and vegetables from the back of a colorful truck that cruised the streets of the Big Easy for more than 50 years, just like his father before him. With his distinctive peddler cry, he became a local celebrity, the subject of a documentary, and the main character in a children's book. Only befitting that, a few days ago, New Orleans held a "second-line" funeral procession to honor him.

Remember: vendors do not just provide good and services. Some of them, at least, enrich our culture.